Just a Grain of Salt

How may I help you?  

19 | Taiwanese-American | she/her | Pansexual
Advocating rationality since 1995.

I now have a fandom blog. For the purpose of blogging fandoms.

"

…the government sees aboriginal justice initiatives (aimed at aboriginal offenders) and a national DNA database for missing persons as appropriate measures…Surely tracking indigenous girls’ DNA so they can be identified after they die is not the starting point for justice. Indigenous women want to matter before we go missing. We want our lives to matter as much as our deaths; our stake in the present political struggle for indigenous resurgence is as vital as the future.

So do we need an inquiry?

We need to stop the killing of 15-year-old native girls. We need to put an end to the abduction of indigenous women. We need to overhaul a justice system in which justice is so distorted that it is no longer recognizable. We need no more excuses, no more condolences, no more lists of missing women. We need an end to treating violence as mundane.

An inquiry will only help if it has action attached and if it shifts power into the hands of indigenous women, meaning it is led by indigenous women…Accountability means supporting existing anti-violence measures already being initiated by indigenous communities. These include rite-of-passage ceremonies to restore honour for young women, the Moosehide Campaign in which native boys and men take on culturally-relevant responsibilities to end violence toward women, and mentoring between girls and women which fosters the resurgence of women’s cultural roles at a local level…Accountability means supporting indigenous visions of justice, restoring our humanity and upholding girls’ resistance and leadership.

Treating our deaths as unremarkable is a form of violence that needs to stop along with the murders themselves. Taking steps to end the violence now is the only route to justice.

"
— 9 hours ago with 100 notes
#indigenous issues 

micdotcom:

Vile photos show the crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border no one is talking about

With a spate of huge stories breaking in the past few weeks, you might not have caught the massive environmental crisis in northern Mexico that began earlier in August.

According to the Associated Press, local politicians claim that Grupo Mexico, a private mining company in Sonora with a troubling track record of hazardous waste violations in Mexico and the U.S., was slow to report a disastrous fault in its leaching ponds, which hold industrial acid used in the mining process. The spill released around 10 million gallons of acid into the Bacanuchi and Sonora Rivers.

20,000 people were without water | Follow micdotcom 

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

— 9 hours ago with 32417 notes
#environment  #mexico  #usa 
"This is the phenomenon at play when an Asian American fraternity implicitly approves of an act of anti-black racism. And this isn’t an isolated incident of negative black attitudes. In Racism Without Racists, sociologist Eduardo Bonilla-Silva presents survey results showing that Asian American political attitudes, including those regarding stereotypes of blacks, are very similar to those of whites. On some items, Asian Americans even demonstrated stronger anti-black attitudes than whites. In this way, they are following in the footsteps of other formerly marginalized groups who demonized blackness on their way to whiteness.
—-
Regardless of whether this racial project ends the way that Yancey predicts (and phenotypic differences stand to undermine his argument, a critique that Bonilla-Silva makes in the aforementioned book), the ever-present hunger to become closer to whiteness creates anti-black racism among non-black minority groups as they seek to climb the social ladder using rungs of black hate. Other groups do not have to become white for Yancey’s black/non-black project to be realized. If blacks become the permanent out-group by which other minorities measure their social advancement we will have reached that point.
—-
Will Asian-Americans and Latinos choose to confront their anti-black prejudice in an attempt to build the racial coalitions necessary to effectively combat white supremacy or will they chose the path of the Irish and decide that they are better off trying to align themselves with the other side and try to lay claim to the privilege of whiteness?"
Robert Reece, in “Black/Non-Black Divide and The Anti-Blackness of Non-Black Minorities” [x] (via baritonepats)

(via titotito)

— 10 hours ago with 19 notes
#antiblackness 
Very Funny, JFK

historical-nonfiction:

In 1961, New York Post columnist Leonard Lyons contacted John F. Kennedy after seeing Presidential autographs for sale in a store and informed him of the prices. At the time, George Washington’s was priced at $175, Ulysses S. Grant’s at $55, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s at $75, Teddy Roosevelt’s at $67.50, and JFK’s at $75. Below is the response mailed to Lyons.

image

(Source: lettersofnote.com)

— 21 hours ago with 564 notes
#historical 
alivesoul:

Welcome to Passive, New York
As Andy Henriquez, a 19 year old from Washington Heights lay in his cell dying from a tear in his aorta, an artery that supplies blood to the heart, he asked a guard if he could call his mother just to say goodbye. For days he suffered in pain barely able to breathe as the blood made its way down to his groin. He request was denied. His fellow inmates knew something was wrong. They screamed and kicked doors in a failed bid to get Andy some help.  A doctor who visited him earlier that day prescribed him hand cream and wrote the prescription in the wrong name.
Hours later he was found dead on the floor of his cell.
This happened in April of last year, New Yorkers are just hearing about it today because a suit has been filed by the lawyer of Mr. Henriquez’s family.
In this last year I have been thinking about some things….
I have thought about the death of Eric Garner and the muted outrage that followed.
I have thought about all the black men who were set up by Detective Louis Scarcella from Brooklyn, who have languished in jail for years and are just now having their cases reviewed after it was discovered Scarcella was crooked and the silence that followed.
I have thought about how everyone just accepts that Stop and Frisk is a thing of the past and that the rights of black and brown men here in New York City are not still being violated.
I have thought about how slick it was for our Mayor to parade his black family in front of the cameras to get elected and how New Yorkers have yet to check him for basically being Bloomberg 2.0.
I have thought about those who live in the projects whose stewards, NYCHA, last year said they had a surplus of money to fix them and are now saying this year they have no money.
I have thought about how “affordable housing” here means you must make damn near 100k, yet no one seems to believe that this city hates its poor.
I have thought about the fact that this city has the highest rates of workplace discrimination lawsuits in the country, yet no one wants to address racism in the workplace.
I have thought about how gentrification of this city has made many neighborhoods I once loved and enjoyed unrecognizable and in my view turned its residents into the quietest, softest, most passive lot of New Yorkers I have ever experienced in my lifetime here.
Who the fuck are you people?
There will be very little outrage over Mr. Henriquez’s death. This lot of New Yorkers would be more outraged if you kicked a cat than if you choked a young black man to death or allowed one to internally bleed to death on the floor of a jail cell.

Here’s a source for it in case people are looking.

alivesoul:

Welcome to Passive, New York

As Andy Henriquez, a 19 year old from Washington Heights lay in his cell dying from a tear in his aorta, an artery that supplies blood to the heart, he asked a guard if he could call his mother just to say goodbye. For days he suffered in pain barely able to breathe as the blood made its way down to his groin. He request was denied. His fellow inmates knew something was wrong. They screamed and kicked doors in a failed bid to get Andy some help.

A doctor who visited him earlier that day prescribed him hand cream and wrote the prescription in the wrong name.

Hours later he was found dead on the floor of his cell.

This happened in April of last year, New Yorkers are just hearing about it today because a suit has been filed by the lawyer of Mr. Henriquez’s family.

In this last year I have been thinking about some things….

I have thought about the death of Eric Garner and the muted outrage that followed.

I have thought about all the black men who were set up by Detective Louis Scarcella from Brooklyn, who have languished in jail for years and are just now having their cases reviewed after it was discovered Scarcella was crooked and the silence that followed.

I have thought about how everyone just accepts that Stop and Frisk is a thing of the past and that the rights of black and brown men here in New York City are not still being violated.

I have thought about how slick it was for our Mayor to parade his black family in front of the cameras to get elected and how New Yorkers have yet to check him for basically being Bloomberg 2.0.

I have thought about those who live in the projects whose stewards, NYCHA, last year said they had a surplus of money to fix them and are now saying this year they have no money.

I have thought about how “affordable housing” here means you must make damn near 100k, yet no one seems to believe that this city hates its poor.

I have thought about the fact that this city has the highest rates of workplace discrimination lawsuits in the country, yet no one wants to address racism in the workplace.

I have thought about how gentrification of this city has made many neighborhoods I once loved and enjoyed unrecognizable and in my view turned its residents into the quietest, softest, most passive lot of New Yorkers I have ever experienced in my lifetime here.

Who the fuck are you people?

There will be very little outrage over Mr. Henriquez’s death. This lot of New Yorkers would be more outraged if you kicked a cat than if you choked a young black man to death or allowed one to internally bleed to death on the floor of a jail cell.

Here’s a source for it in case people are looking.

(via owning-my-truth)

— 1 day ago with 10347 notes
#justice system  #police brutality 
"We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’"

Rolling Around In My Head: No Means Force

HOW THE FUCK IS IT EVEN LEGAL to force a child to have their ears pierced?

…oh, right. Nobody gives a fuck about what children want.

(via brutereason)

(via spaceships-in-the-club)

— 1 day ago with 477 notes
#children  #i wonder if i should tag this as  #child abuse 
modelsofcolor:

MISSING!! Ataui has been missing since Aug. 6 after disappearing near a Midtown nightclub, police said Monday.whose full name is Ataui Deng Hopkins, was last seen near 251 West 48th St., where nightclubs XVI Lounge and The Attic are located, at roughly 11 p.m., according to the NYPD.She was reported missing by her boyfriend, Grant Monohon, on Aug. 16, sources said. He told investigators that the last time he saw her, Aug. 6, she told him she wanted to sleep in a park, law enforcement sources said.Relatives also told detectives that Deng would occasionally take off for a few days, sources said.A man who said he was the owner of The Attic said police had been by but, “we don’t know nothing. She was never here.”A manager there said Grant Monohon (Ataui’s bf) never worked there. Monohon’s Instagram feed is covered with photos of him, Deng and other people partying at The Attic and other nightclubs.Information report by http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20140818/midtown/model-ataui-deng-has-been-missing-for-2-weeks-police-say
Anyone with any information about Deng’s disappearance is asked to called Crime Stoppers at , or NYPDCrimeStoppers.com or text TIP577 to the number 274637. Or Email FindAtaui@gmail.com

modelsofcolor:

MISSING!! Ataui has been missing since Aug. 6 after disappearing near a Midtown nightclub, police said Monday.
whose full name is Ataui Deng Hopkins, was last seen near 251 West 48th St., where nightclubs XVI Lounge and The Attic are located, at roughly 11 p.m., according to the NYPD.
She was reported missing by her boyfriend, Grant Monohon, on Aug. 16, sources said. He told investigators that the last time he saw her, Aug. 6, she told him she wanted to sleep in a park, law enforcement sources said.
Relatives also told detectives that Deng would occasionally take off for a few days, sources said.
A man who said he was the owner of The Attic said police had been by but, “we don’t know nothing. She was never here.”
A manager there said Grant Monohon (Ataui’s bf) never worked there. Monohon’s Instagram feed is covered with photos of him, Deng and other people partying at The Attic and other nightclubs.

Information report by
http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20140818/midtown/model-ataui-deng-has-been-missing-for-2-weeks-police-say

Anyone with any information about Deng’s disappearance is asked to called Crime Stoppers at , or NYPDCrimeStoppers.com or text TIP577 to the number 274637. Or Email FindAtaui@gmail.com

(via horsantulas)

— 2 days ago with 7513 notes
#signal boost 
Hey, White Americans. We Need to Talk.

postcardsfromspace:

According to a Pew Research survey, only 37% of white Americans think the events in #Ferguson raise important issues about race.

Okay, fellow white people. We need to talk.

Let me tell you a story: I was an angry punk teenager. Not violent, but I did a shitton of trespassing, and I got into a lot of screaming matches with cops.

I have never been arrested.

I have never been violently attacked by police. Hell, I have never been seriously threatened by police.

I am fully aware that I’ve survived to adulthood largely on the benefits of my race.

When you are white in America, you get away with all sorts of shit. Have you read this account from a white dude who actively tried to get himself arrested? You should. It’s telling.

So, if that’s your main frame of reference for dealing with law enforcement, it is really easy to assume that when someone else gets targeted by the police, they must have done something really bad. After all, you know the police aren’t that petty, right? They’re there to help: That’s what TV tells you, what your teachers told you, what your parents told you. “If you’re in trouble, find a police officer. They’ll help.” And, y’know, if you’re white, most of the time, that’s probably true.

When you’re white in America, it is awfully easy to pretend that you don’t live in a country where the nonviolent physical presence of black people, especially black men, is considered sufficient threat to justify use of lethal force. It’s really easy to pretend that laws are enforced equally; that arrest rate has any demographic resemblance to actual crime rates; that the police are there to protect us from the bad guys.

And, I mean, I get that. It’s a lot more comfortable to pretend that safety correlates to virtue than to confront the ugly truth that a system that benefits you very directly does so at the cost of other people’s lives; that what you were taught was the just reward for being a good person is, in fact, the privilege of your skin. That’s a big part of why we work so hard to retcon narratives about how the black people our police murder must have been dangerous, highlight every casual infraction like it’s a killing spree. We are so desperate to believe that the system that feeds us is just.

It doesn’t feel good to acknowledge that stuff. It feels gross. A system we trusted—one we should be able to trust, that should work for the benefit and protection of everyone has made us accomplice to some deeply horrifying shit.

But here’s the thing:

This happenedThis is happening. Not recognizing it; stonewalling and insulating ourselves in our little bubbles does not make it go away.

And not acknowledging it, not having asked for it, does not make us any less complicit, or any less responsible for owning and fixing this. We are actively benefitting from a fucked, corrupt, murderous system. That is on us. As it should be.

So educate yourself, get the tools, and start dismantling this fucker. You have the time: after all,  no one’s shooting at your kids.

Privilege is the bandwidth to speak up and dismantle because you’re not in fear for your life. And there is no conscionable excuse for failing to use it.

(via terriblearguments)

— 2 days ago with 21587 notes
#racism  #justice system